Ax the Pink Tax

By Diya Saha

While walking through the aisles of Shoppers Drug Mart, I spotted the price differences between identical products for men and women. The prices for women’s products were higher than the ones for men. The Gillette razor for men was priced 2 dollars more than the Gillette Venus razor for women, both razors had the same features, the same number of cartridges, yet the Gillette Venus was priced higher. Now, I hadn’t only noticed this pattern in the price for the razors, but for the deodorants, shampoos, and all the other products that had a version for men and women. I had wondered why I hadn’t noticed this difference before, and why no one seemed to be questioning the price difference? It isn’t fair that a woman has to pay a higher price for the same products.  Continue reading Ax the Pink Tax

Why Do We Try so Hard to Make Feminism Palatable to Men?

By Noor Mirza-Rashid

We’ve distilled feminism into a shell of what it was supposed to be. Us applauding men and validating their fake feminism is part of the process of making feminism more “digestible” and more “palatable”. By celebrating the bare minimum, we’re reinforcing the notion that the only requirement of being a feminist is saying that you believe in equality.
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“White Passing”: Between Identities

By Noor Mirza-Rashid

“White-passing”. The term, although only recently named as such, has been something I’ve felt my whole life. Although I’m Pakistani through and through, even according to 23andMe, the label has nearly defined me. Even my own family, since I was four years old, has referred to me as white. One of my only memories of my great-grandmother was sitting with her in the sunroom when she came back from Pakistan for the summer, her praising my pale skin and “Canadian” looks. My brother has made fun of me for being a Starbucks drinking white girl, made jokes about how I don’t even look brown, about how I’m not “a real p*ki”. At school, I’ve been laughed at (by white people) for calling myself brown, and in TikTok comments, I’ve been referred to, of course, as “white-passing”. 

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Not All Men but 97% of Women

By Andrea Dovale-Puig

Being a feminist means you support the advocacy of women’s rights on the basis of equality of the sexes. In other words, it signifies that you believe that men and women should be treated equally in society and have the same opportunities. This all should sound reasonable to the decent person. So then why isn’t every person you know a feminist? 

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The Problem With Pandemic Films

By Natasha Kangrga

No doubt, you’ve heard of the pandemic film, also known as the genre of films about widespread viruses, plagues, and diseases. Today, we associate the pandemic film with COVID-19, and from March 16th to March 20th, several pandemic films have found their way into the South by Southwest (SXSW) Film Festival. We don’t need them.

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A Complaint on the Richview Saint: It’s Time We Change our Mascot

By Sathya Siva

What do you think of when you hear the word saint? Do you think of high-school? A football team? How about a public school logo? Yeah, I didn’t think so. When I think of a saint, I think of a ‘holy person’ depicted in Christianity who is supposedly ‘close to God’. So is our school logo promoting Christianity?

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Acknowledging Asian Hate

By Christina Dinh

Scrolling through Instagram, looking through my friend’s stories, seeing post after post about the rise of hate crimes against Asian communities in Canada and the United States. Throughout the pandemic, I would see the occasional post regarding the increase in xenophobia and hatred towards Asian people. It felt strange seeing the amount of people now caring about the issue and raising awareness. Ultimately because I never felt like people cared at all.

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The Big Picture

By Diya Saha

During quarantine I have been thinking a lot- I mean I always think about everything, but it’s just that I have been thinking more about myself. I’ve been thinking about how we as humans tend to overthink everything at that very moment.

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Richview’s Science Stool Struggles

By Lauren Olszaniecki

Richview’s 30-year-old science labs have got to go. More specifically, the stools, lamented by students of all ages, genders and sizes. Even teachers agree that the science labs’ stools are one of the worst parts of teaching. I’ve learned that a significant part of the science department’s limited budget is spent on getting new stools to replace broken ones. 

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